Monthly Archives: March 2017

March 11th National Trust Meeting Post: Youth Involvement In Environmentalism

Posted on - in define feminist

For the first time since I’ve moved back to St. Lucia, I did what I’ve always been meaning to do — get involved. I’ll be honest, it’s been difficult. I don’t live with parents and I support myself 100%. That means since 2015, many details of adulthood have been totally new and 100% my responsibility. Since moving back here, my partner has lost his grandmother as well as his mother. My home has been tainted by the stress of small business ownership as well as grief. Finally, there has been some sign that life has settled down and I leapt at this opportunity to attend a National Trust meeting.

Environmental Damage Is Not The Sole Responsibility Of The Poor

Posted on - in intersectional feminism

 

Unconsciously, most of us associate environmental destruction as being the responsibility of the poor. Big statement. But it’s true. When we think of ways to cut back on the ways we (West Indians) damage our environment, our focus is nearly always on “education”. Poverty and a lack of education are commonly linked in our collective consciousness. Therefore, when we link “education” as a solution to a problem, we are inadvertently linking that problem to poverty. While this might be helpful for STI reduction or something of that nature, in the case of climate change, it allows our people and our government to turn a blind eye to other problems that have an environmental impact yet fly under the radar.

Socioeconomic Class And Climate Change

Posted on - in intersectional feminism

As sea levels continue to rise in the Caribbean, our region will require long-term planning (ha) and forethought about how certain areas are affected and what the government will do to mitigate these effects. In Saint Lucia, particularly vulnerable areas include fishing villages like Dennery and Anse La Raye. The “village center” of nearly every district, including the capital city,┬áCastries sits right at sea level. This means in the future, these areas will be disproportionately affected by the┬árising sea levels.