Women’s Wednesdays: We Need More Than ‘Empowerment’

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in feminist meaning

Empowerment is one of those subjects for feminists that sounds like a good idea in theory and of course since the entire focus is on feeling good/strong, it can be a compelling “focus” for feminists. Caribbean feminists, however, should be focused on anything but empowerment. Empowerment is a feeling, an idea, a notion. Empowerment is nothing concrete and tends not to have any real long-term measurable impact.

LGBT Tuesday: Caribbean Feminism & LGBT Liberation Must Be Unified

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in define feminist

In the Caribbean, there’s a strong sense that feminism and LGBT liberation are two separate issues. However, I worry that this separation is less for practical reasons such as different needs from society and the community. I suspect a large portion of the separation between Caribbean feminists and the LGBT community is flat out homophobia.

Think I’m wrong?

Hear me out…

Why We Need A Women’s Only Gym In Saint Lucia

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in black feminism

Recently, I’ve been going to Mango Moon (Vigie) on and off, but I’ve also been a member of Fitness Freaks (for a time). The more time I spend in these male-dominated spaces, the more I’ve developed a case for a women’s only gym that doesn’t just have treadmills and ellipticals.

This hasn’t just been my experience; the experience of discomfort in male-dominated spaces in Saint Lucia has been echoed by other Saint Lucian women.

The issue with gyms being a non-explicit male dominated space is there may be the false assumption that men and women are both equally welcome in workout spaces when this just isn’t the case.

West Indian Educational Trauma

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in intersectional feminism

 

[Content Warning: abuse, violence]

In primary and secondary schools in the Caribbean, students are often subjected to vast amounts of psychological and physical abuse. Yet, if you say this and look back on your education with less than adulation, you are chastised. It’s as if you broke some unspoken code, to sweep the abuse under the rug and as is the typical course in our society, protect the abusers from criticism and ultimately, accountability.

I’ve written in the past about how violent disciplinary methods disproportionately target blacker students from poor backgrounds. And I’ve written about how physical violence disproportionately targets male students in our schools. I’ve also taken the time to identify the definitions of both psychological and emotional abuse in previous posts. If you need a refresher, please take one before you continue reading.

Why I Hate Resort Tourism | NEW VIDEO!

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in Caribbean YouTube Videos

This week for this blog, instead of writing about resort tourism, I’ve decided to create a video about the subject. Sometimes I can organize my thoughts better on camera, so I hope you find this video both informative and succinct.

Thank you very much for watching and be sure to leave your comments on this blog post or on the video.

 

Respectability Politics In The Caribbean

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in define feminist

 

Respectability politics refers to the ways we as a community police ourselves and attempt to align ourselves with what the mainstream deems as appropriate rather than challenging the mainstream for refusing to accept us as we are. Respectability politics lead to statements like “pull up your pants if you want respect” or “stop sagging your pants”. This can also be applied to situations where people suggest that women should cover up more if they want to be treated with respect.

March 11th National Trust Meeting Post: Youth Involvement In Environmentalism

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in define feminist

For the first time since I’ve moved back to St. Lucia, I did what I’ve always been meaning to do — get involved. I’ll be honest, it’s been difficult. I don’t live with parents and I support myself 100%. That means since 2015, many details of adulthood have been totally new and 100% my responsibility. Since moving back here, my partner has lost his grandmother as well as his mother. My home has been tainted by the stress of small business ownership as well as grief. Finally, there has been some sign that life has settled down and I leapt at this opportunity to attend a National Trust meeting.

Environmental Damage Is Not The Sole Responsibility Of The Poor

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in intersectional feminism

 

Unconsciously, most of us associate environmental destruction as being the responsibility of the poor. Big statement. But it’s true. When we think of ways to cut back on the ways we (West Indians) damage our environment, our focus is nearly always on “education”. Poverty and a lack of education are commonly linked in our collective consciousness. Therefore, when we link “education” as a solution to a problem, we are inadvertently linking that problem to poverty. While this might be helpful for STI reduction or something of that nature, in the case of climate change, it allows our people and our government to turn a blind eye to other problems that have an environmental impact yet fly under the radar.

Socioeconomic Class And Climate Change

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in intersectional feminism

As sea levels continue to rise in the Caribbean, our region will require long-term planning (ha) and forethought about how certain areas are affected and what the government will do to mitigate these effects. In Saint Lucia, particularly vulnerable areas include fishing villages like Dennery and Anse La Raye. The “village center” of nearly every district, including the capital city, Castries sits right at sea level. This means in the future, these areas will be disproportionately affected by the rising sea levels.