As sea levels continue to rise in the Caribbean, our region will require long-term planning (ha) and forethought about how certain areas are affected and what the government will do to mitigate these effects. In Saint Lucia, particularly vulnerable areas include fishing villages like Dennery and Anse La Raye. The “village center” of nearly every district, including the capital city, Castries sits right at sea level. This means in the future, these areas will be disproportionately affected by the rising sea levels.

Socioeconomic class is something we pretend is invisible or unimportant in our region, but as the effects of climate change grow more widespread, the disparities between socioeconomic classes will differ immensely. We will see further income inequality as well as physical damage to our landscape and natural resources as climate change continues to unfold.

How seriously our politicians take climate change speaks to how much they genuinely care about the most vulnerable populations that they serve. (Remember, the government serves the people of the country.) In recent times, the views of certain politicians have become quite clear. Instead of working towards preservation of natural resources or long-term infrastructural planning, our government appears to be occupied with furthering the expansion of foreign capitalists exploitation of our local lands and natural resources.

Our population is sometimes chided for their docility. This is largely revisionist history intended to encourage us to remain docile. (Yes, we’re all the victims of reverse psychology.) However, Saint Lucia has always had a strong culture of resistance to exploitation and we can see that resistance continued today via the recent open letter sent to the Prime Minister of Saint Lucia. This resistance is just one step towards environmental justice. Our local National Trust organization is another front of resistance against environmental exploitation that has effectively aided in preventing a number of destructive practices on Saint Lucian lands.

As citizens, we will need to strengthen our commitment to direct action in favor of our short and long-term goals as a population if we are to successfully resist not just this attempt at exploitation, but the ones that are sure to happen in the future. When the ocean’s waters start creeping up the coast and destroying the homes of our nation’s most vulnerable, will be equally ready to defend them? When what is being destroyed is something we deem unimportant, we need to be equally prepared to stand up for what is right.

The action against the proposed inhumane practices at Pigeon Island National Park provides encouragement for our population. We will need to solidify and expand this action sooner than we think as we start to experience the damaging effects of climate change on our coasts. Going forward, Saint Lucians (and West Indians in general) need to strengthen our commitment to equality. We should pursue justice for the poor with the same fervor we pursue justice for areas of our island that command international respect (like our Pitons or Pigeon Island National Park). We have a lot of difficult work ahead of us as  a nation, but we’re beginning to return to our roots — those roots of resistance that have served us throughout our people’s history.

 

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